The Cinema of Nicholas Pesce: Piercing and the Eyes of my Mother

Almost 20 years ago, multiplex horror was declared unequivocally, irresolutely dead by many a moviegoer who, tired of seeing travesties coming in the form of packages stacked with a jump scare every approximate 10 minutes and denouement that made no sense simply stopped going to such movies and searched other means to get their horror on. J-horror (and its clones) were dead on arrival. How was a lover of all things dark to get one’s dread on?

The decade that just ended brought quite the relief, but I won’t get into a convoluted essay detailing the arrival of critically-acclaimed, artsy horror courtesy of indie cinema. Indie horror has been delivering since Night of the Living Dead, if not earlier — can we lump the producer Val Lewton in this group? — so before I get ripped to smithereens by what I said, I am referring to popcorn horror made to make a killing in the box office during its release week and then run.

Nicholas Pesce made quite a debut in late 2016 with a brief little black and white horror movie called The Eyes of my Mother. That movie told, with minimal special effects and a wall of atmospheric dread, the rather disturbing story of a young girl living in the country who sees a strange man do something unspeakable to her family. What happens after that is just as atrocious, in that it perpetuates the same act that brought down her family, and seeks, through repetition, permutate itself into the future, with horrific consequences.

Pesce’s follow-up, Piercing, veers closer to J-Horror in that it was written by the man who brought you 1999’s Audition so if you saw Audition you know what to expect with Piercing. Pesce’s sophomore movie tells the story of a businessman (Christopher Abbott) who has a penchant for murder. It’s safe to say that he keeps it well-hidden from his unsuspecting wife (Laia Costa) for obvious reasons (who would want to bring a wife into this situation? said no one ever). When he meets the woman he’s decided to perform some unspeakable stuff on, he’s in for quite a treat. Jackie (Mia Wasikowska) as she is called comes with some rather disturbing baggage herself, wrapped in a cocoon made of fur.

It is safe to say that from here on nothing goes as planned in Pesce’s movie, and thank God. It would have been an exercise in misogynistic porn to see Abbott stalking and tormenting Wasikowska’s damaged character for a prolonged sequence of time. That, in fact, is the least of what happens here, as both actors switch on the power button at ease and we, the viewer, just sit back and see the madness unfold.

I wish that Pesce had not caved in to pressure to make a studio film when he came out early in 2020 with his re-imagination of The Grudge. Pesce has a sharp, dense style of telling stories. His characters navigate dark, murky waters and ask for help while lashing out at the rescuer. We really don’t know how deep we will go with his leads, and I love that because it means that anything might happen at any specific moment in his films. Piercing is truly grotesque in ways that made me recall David Cronenberg and Takashi Miike without flat-out imitating them. No, Pesce has his own style, streamlined and defined, and while in The Eyes of My Mother he went for a Val Lewton look, here he goes for a more late 70s period, somewhere deep in Argento but also Fulci or Bava without the excess.

Abbott continues on a streak of unusual roles, following an exercise in Cronenberg horror via Possessor. He’s very good in his part here, showing next to no emotion where it matters the most and an almost unsettling amount of dread at what he may be capable of. Wasikowska, on the other hand, completely deceives as a woman who may be in for more than she bargained for. It’s safe to say that I think these two are a match made in heaven and should make another movie, albeit with a lot less gore, and see what comes out of it,

Grade B+

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